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Octubre 23, 2020 11:00 AM CEST
Chinche Verde - Photo (c) Juan Emilio, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-SA)
de manval: Chinche Verde (Nezara viridula)
Añadido el 03 diciembre 2020.
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Hypercallia citrinalis - Photo (c) pachec, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Hypercallia citrinalis, un miembro de Mariposas Y Polillas (Orden Lepidoptera)
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Mariposa Almirante Rojo Vanessa atalanta

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Septiembre 24, 2020 09:04 AM BST
Mariposa Almirante Rojo - Photo (c) Gilles San Martin, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-SA)
de manval: Mariposa Almirante Rojo (Vanessa atalanta)
Añadido el 03 diciembre 2020.
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Chinche Gigante Patas de Hoja Acanthocephala declivis

Autor

grinnin

Fecha

Agosto 18, 2018 02:54 PM UTC

Descripción

Leaf-footed bugs (in the leaf-footed bug family Coreidae, though not all Coreids have the little flange on the hind tibia that gives the group its name) will grab your attention, especially the noticeable leaf-like extensions on their hind tibia, the reason for their common name.

The leaf-footed bug, with a tiny head relative to its elongated body, has a four-segmented beak, and four-segmented antennae. The pronotum (a prominent plate-like structure that covers all or part of its thorax) is both wider and longer than the head.

Leaf-footed bugs, which take their common name from leaf-shaped expansions of the hind tibia and femora, have four-segmented antennae, large compound eyes, and a pair of ocelli, or simple eyes.

True bugs – like this leaf-footed bug late stage nymph – are easy to tell from any other insect because of their tiny heads shaped like a stick, with eyes on opposite sides. The shape of the legs resembles that of a dry leaf on the impressive leaf-footed bug.

A closer look at where the antennae arise, or are connected, on the head: in LFB (leaf-footed bugs), the antenna arise at the tip of the beak, which hinges under the head. A long, narrow leaf-footed bug head holds sturdy brown antennae. And, these bugs are often shy.

In entomology "bug" is a common named reserved for insects in the order Hemiptera (Hemiptera means “half wing); in the true bugs the mandibles and maxillae function as a piercing-sucking organ: although their mouthparts are designed to pierce, leaf-footed bugs do not bite humans or other animals, and they only use them to suck juices from leaves, stems, and fruit.

On the move (in constant motion the entire time I saw it), maybe looking to find another one just like its own self: while you may see just one or two leaf-footed bugs, they have the habit of gathering in larger groups.

The basal half of the forewings is thickened and leathery, and known as the corium; the posterior half is membranous: such wings are known as hemelytra and are unique to the Hemiptera, true "bugs": Hemiptera literally means "half-winged," the prefix "hemi-" meaning half, and "pter" meaning wing [most of the order names for insects contain "-ptera", making lots of them easy to remember], for the wings are membranous (like a fly’s wing) at the tip but leathery at the base.

Leaf-footed bugs, ¾ - 1 inch long, can be identified by the flattened, leaf-like hind tibia, a unique trait that explains their common name.

The coreids are one of a favorite groups of insects, partly because they are not miniscule and, indeed, are often rather large and somewhat showy; coreid bugs, (family Coreidae), also called leaf-footed bug or squash bug, some 2,000 widely-distributed species of bugs (order Heteroptera), are large and some – like this one – have the wide and flattened tibiae; nymphs are structurally similar to adults but have undeveloped wings (wing pads). The leaf-footed bugs in the family Coreidae get their name from the expansion of the tibia (leg segment) into a leaf shaped surface, and the shape of their body tapers at the tail-end.

Leaf-footed bugs (family Coreidae) have a common name based on leaf-like expansions of their hind tibia, technically not their "feet", which are called tarsi, the leg end segments they actually walk on.

With a side view to its straw-like piecing/sucking mouthparts tucked under the body, which are inserted into a plant to suck juices, typical of members of its order, the Hemiptera (True Bugs); all species of Coreidae (predominantly sap-sucking insects in the Hemipteran suborder Heteroptera) are phytophagous, plant-feeders: like all true bugs, adults are equipped with a beak, or rostrum, a hypodermic needle-like device carried under the head, to pierce the plant tissue and suck out liquids – but they do not simply “suck out sap” – they inject a tissue-dissolving saliva, and vacuum out the resulting slurry, with widespread damage to the plant as result of these liquefying enzymes, a method of feeding called external digestion, and the mouthparts can drill through the tough outer layers of the plant and reach the soft nutritious center.

This insect is a type of stink bug, very evident if you grab one with your hands; emitting an unpleasant odor when crushed or provoked is a defense action that keeps predators (and people) at bay.

Showing a view of the flared, leaflike tibia on the back legs, hence their name: leaf-footed bugs. Indeed an interesting bug is the leaf-footed bug with its armored body and orange-tipped antennae in four distinc segments with the most distal one a light beige color; this true bug (Heteroptera) in the leaf-footed bug family (Coreidae) and order Hemiptera looks quite like a prehistoric armored vehicle. The massive and spiny legs on the leaf-footed bug are unusual for most bugs.

Interestingly enough, the main host plant of this critter is the thistle.

This bug has a unique appearance, including my photo showing its middle legs in parallel alignment, the others splayed. This bug also has a wide, prominent carapace ('shoulders') that somewhat resembles armor.

Leaf-footed bugs overwinter as adults in protected areas, such as in woody brush, barns or other buildings, and they lay eggs in spring as the weather begins to warm, nymphs emerge after 1 week, then begin to develop into adults within 5-8 weeks, typically forming 2-3 generations from the spring through summer; adults migrate from weedy and brushy areas into vegetable gardens and landscapes, often when the fruits of your labor begin to ripen.

"Gotta go:" this amber-colored round drop was just one of a bunch of drops the bug paused to eliminate straight onto the ground...

The genus Leptoglossus of the order Hemiptera, or true bugs, contains the classic leaf-footed bugs: the hind tibiae have large flared processes that resemble the shape of leaves.

The genus Leptoglossus contains the classic leaf-footed bugs, their hind tibiae with large flared processes that resemble the shape of leaves: when these insects fly, their back legs hang down and they are easily mistaken for wasps, which also drag their hind legs in flight; they also buzz like wasps when flying.

With a fuzzy view of the spiracles, how insects breathe, through the valves on the side of their body: in humans, the outside of our respiratory system is our nose, but most terrestrial insects have a series of openings visible along the sides of the thorax and abdomen, where oxygen enters and carbon dioxide leaves through the opening; however, water vapor can also escape through the opening, so in order to prevent dehydration and minimize the water vapor loss, the tracheal opening contains a valve called a spiracle that can open and close, but is closed most of the time (when enough carbon dioxide builds up inside the tube, the spiracle opens and the carbon dioxide is released, thus, insects close the spiracles and hold their breath for a period, then open the spiracles briefly to exhale and inhale and quickly close the spiracles once more, a process minimizing the loss of water vapor).

Many of these species easily identified as a leaf-footed bug by its broad, leaf-shaped tibia have a variation of yellow orange on their antennae, and this is also pretty good dorsal view of the leaf-footed bug, an example of insects that exhibit parental care: when scientists removed leaf-footed bug adults from their young and placed them on a nearby plant, the adult bugs flew back to the nymphs and stayed with them.

The adult leaf-footed bug, brownish in color and about three-quarters of an inch in length, has an elongated body with a triangular thorax, the midsection (tagma) of the insect body holding the head, legs, wings, and abdomen; the young (nymphs) look just like the adults but are smaller, have no wings, and are orange to light brown in color.

Leaf-footed bugs are so named because of the flattened tibia on the rear legs (the tibia is the leg section between the foot and the section that is attached to the body).

Like all true bugs, leaf-footed bugs undergo simple metamorphosis with three life stages: egg, nymph, and adult; flightless nymphs hatch and molt through several instars until reaching adulthood.

The 'feet', or tarsi, of true bugs, particularly in the suborder of Heteroptera like this bug, are 3-segmented.

The most commonly encountered North American leaf-footed bugs are likely those of the genus Leptoglossus: 11 Leptoglossus species inhabit the U.S.A. and Canada, including this eastern leaf-footed bug (Leptoglossus phyllopus).

One amazing thing about this insect is how toughly-built it is – lots of strong skeletal elements, including spikes – and this angle also gives a good view of the extra-wide "shoulders" that is, the humeral angles of pronotum broadly expanded, extending laterally well beyond maximum lateral abdominal margin.

The last image shows tarsal claws on the end of the legs, with raindrops caught in some of the leg hairs.

Chinche Gigante Patas de Hoja - Photo (c) Sharpj99, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC-SA)
de manval: Chinche Gigante Patas de Hoja (Acanthocephala declivis)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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Diciembre 2, 2020 03:42 PM CET

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Halyomorpha halys - Photo (c) Victor W Fazio III, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Halyomorpha halys, un miembro de Chinches Hediondas (Familia Pentatomidae)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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Nomophila noctuella - Photo (c) Kostas Zontanos, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Nomophila noctuella, un miembro de Polillas del Pasto (Familia Crambidae)
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Pyralis farinalis - Photo (c) Victor W Fazio III, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Pyralis farinalis, un miembro de Mariposas Y Polillas (Orden Lepidoptera)
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Chinche de la Alfalfa Adelphocoris lineolatus

Autor

khd

Fecha

Julio 7, 2020 12:31 PM CEST
Chinche de la Alfalfa - Photo (c) salvatore_infanti, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Chinche de la Alfalfa (Adelphocoris lineolatus)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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Chinches Y Parientes Suborden Heteroptera

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amelia08

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Diciembre 2, 2020 02:31 PM CET
Piesma capitatum - Photo (c) Roman, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY)
de manval: Piesma capitatum, un miembro de Chinches de Las Semillas Y Parientes (Superfamilia Lygaeoidea)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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Elasmostethus - Photo (c) Katja Schulz, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY)
de manval: Género Elasmostethus, un miembro de Chinches Hediondas (Superfamilia Pentatomoidea)
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Chinche de la Fresa Dolycoris baccarum

Autor

aeroself

Fecha

Julio 12, 2009 01:51 PM UTC
Chinche de la Fresa - Photo (c) Sarah Gregg, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC-SA)
de manval: Chinche de la Fresa (Dolycoris baccarum)
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Chinche Roja del Melocotonero Oxycarenus lavaterae

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romanvrbicek

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Diciembre 2, 2020 03:33 PM CET
Chinche Roja del Melocotonero - Photo (c) Katja Schulz, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY)
de manval: Chinche Roja del Melocotonero (Oxycarenus lavaterae)
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birdingjulia

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Octubre 1, 2016 10:40 AM CEST
Tropidothorax leucopterus - Photo (c) Ingeborg van Leeuwen, todos los derechos reservados, uploaded by wildchroma
de manval: Tropidothorax leucopterus, un miembro de Chinches de Los Algodoncillos Y de Las Semillas (Subfamilia Lygaeinae)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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Hydriris ornatalis - Photo (c) budak, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Hydriris ornatalis, un miembro de Polillas del Pasto (Familia Crambidae)
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Mecyna asinalis - Photo (c) Bruno Durand, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Mecyna asinalis, un miembro de Polillas del Pasto (Familia Crambidae)
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ricardoc

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Diciembre 2, 2020 05:56 PM GMT
Hypena lividalis - Photo (c) Lupoli Roland, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Hypena lividalis, un miembro de Polillas Búho (Superfamilia Noctuoidea)
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esant

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Noviembre 18, 2020 01:56 PM HST
Catoplatus - Photo (c) Ian Boyd, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Género Catoplatus, un miembro de Chinches Y Parientes (Suborden Heteroptera)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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Palpita vitrealis - Photo (c) Juvé Yannick, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Palpita vitrealis, un miembro de Polillas del Pasto (Familia Crambidae)
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Closterotomus biclavatus - Photo (c) Nikolai Vladimirov, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Closterotomus biclavatus, un miembro de Chinches de Las Plantas (Familia Miridae)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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desversen

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Diciembre 2, 2020 07:34 PM CET
Nysius - Photo (c) Sally Adam, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Género Nysius, un miembro de Chinches de Las Semillas (Familia Lygaeidae)
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Chinche de la Fresa Dolycoris baccarum

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Octubre 24, 2006 04:48 PM MSD
Chinche de la Fresa - Photo (c) Sarah Gregg, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC-SA)
de manval: Chinche de la Fresa (Dolycoris baccarum)
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Polilla Gitana Asiática Lymantria dispar

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cpeterlongo

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Julio 18, 2020 04:21 PM CEST
Polilla Gitana Asiática - Photo (c) richardjaybee, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Polilla Gitana Asiática (Lymantria dispar)
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Palomilla de Alacena - Photo (c) skitterbug, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY)
de manval: Palomilla de Alacena (Plodia interpunctella)
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Noviembre 12, 2020 05:39 PM CET
Acronicta rumicis - Photo (c) Donald Hobern, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY)
de manval: Acronicta rumicis, un miembro de Polillas Búho (Familia Noctuidae)
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mtfoliveira

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Marzo 18, 2019 05:23 PM GMT
Rhynocoris erythropus - Photo (c) Valter Jacinto, todos los derechos reservados
de manval: Rhynocoris erythropus, un miembro de Chinches Besuconas Y Parientes (Familia Reduviidae)
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kristobal22

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Agosto 20, 2020 11:23 PM CEST
Opisthograptis luteolata - Photo (c) Bernard DUPONT, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC-SA)
de manval: Opisthograptis luteolata, un miembro de Polillas Esmeralda Y Parientes (Familia Geometridae)
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Chinche Hedionda Gris Rhaphigaster nebulosa

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heidi284

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Diciembre 2, 2020 10:26 PM CET

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Hobscheid (Google, OSM)
Chinche Hedionda Gris - Photo (c) Jakob Fahr, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Chinche Hedionda Gris (Rhaphigaster nebulosa)
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mue29

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Diciembre 2, 2020 08:57 PM CET
Halyomorpha halys - Photo (c) Victor W Fazio III, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Halyomorpha halys, un miembro de Chinches Hediondas (Familia Pentatomidae)
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Chinche Verde Nezara viridula

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Noviembre 19, 2020 05:18 PM CET
Chinche Verde - Photo (c) Juan Emilio, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-SA)
de manval: Chinche Verde (Nezara viridula)
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Chinche Hedionda Gris Rhaphigaster nebulosa

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Noviembre 19, 2020 05:21 PM CET
Chinche Hedionda Gris - Photo (c) Jakob Fahr, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC)
de manval: Chinche Hedionda Gris (Rhaphigaster nebulosa)
Añadido el 02 diciembre 2020.
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