Field Journal #5

Colin Lach
FJ#5

Walking through Wake Robin Retirement Community on Monday April 6th, I was able to identify some birds and learn a bit more about migration. The weather at this time had a high of 68 degrees Fahrenheit and sunny, spring has seemingly arrived and birds are starting to show up due to the warmer weather. The path that I was walking through included mostly forested areas which provided a good opportunity to see a diverse group of birds. My walk and time spent observing lasted a little over two hours from 12:30-2:50.
Throughout my time on the paths of Wake Robin I was able to identify an ok amount of birds however many of the species were heard not seen as I was able to identify a number of birds by calls or songs. I saw a number of Black-capped Chickadees (6) as well as heard and saw an Eastern Phoebe (1). Towards the end of my walk I was able to identify a pair of Northern Cardinals (2) and a pair of Mourning Doves (2), as well I saw a woodpecker that I later confirmed to be a Red-bellied Woodpecker (1).
Of these birds that I identified most of them are expected to be found in Vermont year round, such as the Northern Cardinals, Red-bellied Woodpecker, and Black-capped Chickadee. There are many reasons why these birds are able to forego migration and remain here year round. Specifically Black-capped Chickadees have certain adaptations that allow them to remain in the North-east throughout the winter. With research I was able to learn about three specific things that help them survive. They’re insulated, they’re active and they have a good memory. With a half-inch coat of insulating feathers, chickadees maintain their body temperature at 100 degrees fahrenheit during the daytime. At night, their temperature drops 18 degrees, which reserves their store of fat. Chickadees also remain active to keep warm during the winter, by flying and not staying still for too long. Chickadees gather food very quickly and during autumn they stash food all around their territory. Their good memories enable them to find food during the winter when resources are scarce.
Of the birds I observed the Eastern Phoebe was the only true migrant. Eastern Phoebes travel to the north-east for breeding from the south where they go during the winter non-breeding season. I am sure that this species of bird travels during these times because of temperature, the winter in the north is too cold for them and during the transition to spring the south is too warm. During spring the weather gets warmer and days become longer as well as the growth of more vegetation and possible food. This can serve to be the perfect breeding grounds for some birds including the Eastern Phoebe.
Some advantages of birds arriving in Vermont early in April is that some locations for breeding and better territories may be available that wouldn't be later in the month. However, some disadvantages could be that the weather has not completely shifted and the species has arrived too early to be successful.
Overall this birding trip was successful in terms of observations and I was able to learn a bit more about what birds are migrants and why they migrate. I look forward to future trips as the temp continues to warm up and am excited to see what other birds start to show up.

Black-capped Chickadee x6
Eastern Phoebe x1
Northern Cardinal x2
Red-bellied Woodpecker x1

Anotado por colinlach colinlach, abril 09, jueves 03:53

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

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Qué

Huilota Común Zenaida macroura

Autor

colinlach

Fecha

Abril 6, 2020 11:45 PM EDT

Descripción

2x

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Carpintero de Vientre Rojo Melanerpes carolinus

Autor

colinlach

Fecha

Abril 6, 2020 11:45 PM EDT

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1x

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Qué

Carbonero de Capucha Negra Poecile atricapillus

Autor

colinlach

Fecha

Abril 6, 2020 11:45 PM EDT

Descripción

x6

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Qué

Cardenal Rojo Cardinalis cardinalis

Autor

colinlach

Fecha

Abril 6, 2020 11:45 PM EDT

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x2

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Qué

Papamoscas Fibí Sayornis phoebe

Autor

colinlach

Fecha

Abril 6, 2020 11:45 PM EDT

Descripción

x1

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