A month since my first iNaturalist observation

I've been making identifications on iNaturalist for at least a couple of months, but I made my first set of observations only a month ago on April 30, 2018. Around that time, I saw others making lots of observations as part of the City Nature Challenge. So I decided I'd get out there and make some observations of my own.

For my observational debut, I decided to visit the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center, since that is a nice little spot of wilderness in this busy city, and since there were a few identification mysteries that I wanted to clear up in person. (What kind of Nymphoides is really in that big pond there? What kind of blackberries are really out there? What kind of ferns are really out there?) I intended to stay out there only a couple of hours, but it was such a nice day -- relatively cool, not too sunny but not rainy, not too windy, the frogs were calling, the birds were chirping -- and I was finding so many interesting things -- all sorts of flowers in bloom, tiny insect eggs, unusual insects in yoga poses, etc. -- that I found myself spending almost the whole day out there, ultimately making 80+ observations.

Since I had discovered so much that first day, I figured I'd go explore the rest of the natural areas in the Memorial Park area. Bit by bit over this past month, I covered almost the entire hiking trail system that isn't paved or dedicated to runners. Every outing, I found something interesting and new -- terrain that I didn't know existed in the city, unusual lifeforms of all sorts, nice spots for peaceful contemplation. In total, I spent over 24 hours of the last month out in the field and at least that same amount (if not much more) uploading and researching my 250+ observations. That's over 10 observations per hour in the field, or 1 observation every 5 minutes or so. (I've added my favorite observation from each day to this post.)

It was definitely a crash course in being a naturalist, photographing nature, navigating the Memorial Park trail system, and using the iNaturalist system -- good exercise for the brain, the body, the soul. I was also pleasantly surprised to discover such an active and helpful community out there with experts and projects of all sorts. I guess I'm really part of this community now, and I'll have to figure out what I want to explore next...

Anotado por pisum pisum, 30 de mayo de 2018 a las 06:28 AM

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Abril 30, 2018 10:00 AM CDT

Descripción

tiny eggs (and more!) on a pepper vine leaf

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Muscadinia (Vitis rotundifolia)

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 5, 2018 04:46 PM CDT

Descripción

flowering grape plant

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 6, 2018 04:06 PM CDT

Descripción

a mosquito with her belly half full of (my) blood moving her hind legs up and down for some reason. those hind legs are tipped with white.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 13, 2018 06:45 PM CDT

Descripción

a tiny female pine cone (or some sort of seed?) stuck to a leaf. there were some large loblolly pines (Pinus taeda) nearby.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 14, 2018 12:55 PM CDT

Descripción

a mating pair of tiger beetles. i thought this one big beetle until i shifted my weight and two alarmed beetles scurried off in two different directions. sorry guys!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Mohos Mucilaginosos Y Parientes (Filo Mycetozoa)

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 19, 2018 05:09 PM CDT

Descripción

resin drops on an old log. what kind of tree will still produce resin after it's long dead? i touched one of the resin drops, and it was still soft but not sticky (maybe like fondant).

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Rana Toro (Lithobates catesbeianus)

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 23, 2018 08:59 AM CDT

Descripción

a big yellow frog. i don't think I've seen one quite this shade. there was another frog looking at him when i approached, but that smaller frog jumped away. this one made a few frog noises later.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 26, 2018 05:56 PM CDT

Descripción

a tiny grasshopper(?). this guy was about the the size of a grain of rice. it either flew or jumped away in a very straight line when i got too close.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Caballito Escarlata de Alas Ahumadas (Hetaerina titia)

Autor

pisum

Fecha

Mayo 27, 2018 05:16 PM CDT

Descripción

a cluster of damselflies with dark, red-tinged wings and grayish or bluish bodies hanging out in various vines. the first 3 photos show the 3rd damselfly I encountered here. it settled in a spot with really good lighting and let me get really close for some really good shots. the 4th picture is either that same damselfly after flying to a different perch or the next damselfly i encountered. photos 5 and 6 show the 2nd damselfly that i encountered in this cluster. it and the aforementioned one were hanging out as a pair and have the same sort of wing pattern with a clear patch. the first damselfly that i came across in this cluster, in photos 7 and 8, had completely dark wings and was hanging out across the trail from the two with the clear patches in their wings. the final 2 photos show the last damselfly i passed in this cluster (or at least the last that i photographed). it was a little further down the trail, around the bend and closer to the bayou. it had totally dark wings.

Comentarios

I'm glad you've enjoyed iNaturalist! Even if you start exploring other sites, keep in mind that much, if not most, of the organisms you can find are very seasonal--if you go back after 2 weeks, the kinds of insects and plants you find may be quite different!

Anotado por edanko hace casi 4 años (Advertencia)

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