22 de octubre de 2022

Marked Wing Condylostylus

There are three species of Condylostylus that we don't have a lot of information on, and that are very similar. They are C. inornatus, C. quadricolor, and C. leonardi. All three differ from other marked wing species by having the fore tibiae yellow. Here I will be adding information and accumulating links to possible and confirmed observations.

C. inornatus

Unlike the other species, the mid tibia is dark.
Confirmed observations:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/93545891

C. quadricolor

Unlike C. leonardi, the hind tarsal segments steadily decrease in length, and the border of the green-black areas on each tergite is diffuse.
Confirmed observations:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/123902280
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/123182305
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/115937086
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/109613622
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/106406506
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/93687482
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/84493302
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74010927
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/39780304

Likely, based on range:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/77148364
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20934981
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/138153856
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/129845812
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73957125
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/123017348
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18872833

C. leonardi

Unlike C. quadricolor, the last three hind tarsal segments are all subequal in length, and the border of the green-black areas on each tergite is sharp.
Confirmed observations:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/133698570
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/133860943
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/120273319
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/105136835
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/36996072
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/133712421

Likely, based on range:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/133635244
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/92814269
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/93199299

Females

of C. quadricolor and C. leonardi are distinct from females of the C. sipho group in that they have a dark posterior area on the hind femora.
Observations:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/120273316
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/123320254
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/60385421
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/115995861
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/106406502
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/128160949
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/76041141
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/121393367
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/64223604
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/96330119
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/115414488
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/76968353
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/91027484

Anotado en 22 de octubre de 2022 a las 11:31 PM por zdanko zdanko | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

29 de agosto de 2022

31 de julio de 2022

02 de marzo de 2022

09 de agosto de 2021

Rearing Homopteran-Predatory Syrphid Larvae

My experience with rearing Syrphids is limited to aphid-eating predators. For information about rearing larvae that don't feed on aphids, refer to Rotheray, 1993 (see footnote*).


With the assistance of @edanko, I have reared three Syrphine species: Allograpta obliqua, Eupeodes americanus, and Syrphus knabi. All three of the genera predate on aphids. Here's how I went about it:

First, put the larva in a small, preferably plastic, container. You can choose to put a layer of paper towel on the bottom right now if you wish. Put a layer of paper towel covering the opening of the container, and attach with a rubber band.

Next, you'll want to find a healthy colony of aphids to harvest from. If possible, it's preferable to take from the colony you found the larva on. Every morning and every evening, depending on how fast your larva eats, take a leaf of aphids and put it in the container with the larva. This worked for me, but I'm sure there are more efficient ways of doing that.

Once the larva pupates, if you didn't already, put paper towel on the bottom of the container so it doesn't roll around. Now, all you have to do is wait. Check on the pupa throughout the days to see if the fly has emerged. Once it has, your time to photograph it is limited.

My method to photograph is to put the container in a large ziploc bag, and push the lens through the opening of the bag, leaving as little space as possible for the fly to escape. Hopefully, at this point it's recently eclosed, so it won't fly that much.

Once you have the necessary photos, you can try, if you're confident enough, to get the fly on your finger or another rigid object, and carry it outside. There, you can get better photos with nice lighting, and once the fly is ready, it can leave your finger and fly away.


Thanks for reading! I hope this is helpful. If you have any ideas or suggestions, please leave them in a comment or message me so I can edit this post. This is somewhat of a wiki, as I want this to be a good resource for rearing predatory Syrphids. See comments below from other people with experience in this for some more tips.

*(See p. 26: https://diptera.info/downloads/df_1_9_Colour_Guide_to%20Hoverfly_Larvae.pdf)

Anotado en 09 de agosto de 2021 a las 03:29 PM por zdanko zdanko | 20 comentarios | Deja un comentario