19 de septiembre de 2022

Ruellias in Central Texas, Put Simply

Adapted from somewhere else


About the Ruellias

Called Wild Petunias but they aren't Petunias so that's a LIE; they're named after Jean Ruelle who was a botanist. There are lots of plants named after botanists.
Most will have the flowers open for only one day and then they'll fall off by the end of the day.

We are fortunate to have a great diversity of Ruellia species, some of which occur nowhere else in the 50 states. Take a look at these BONAP maps for a view of all the species and the ranges/distributions.

Important things to note

Key diagnostic characteristics

  • Inflorescence structure - axilary vs panicle topping the stem
  • Leaf texture - waxy, hairy, fringe on margins?
  • Leaf shape, oval vs ovate vs lanceolate


Left: Red circle shows where the stem tops off with a multi-flowered inflorescence (group of flowers). This will grow into a branched structure known as a panicle. There are some flowers coming from the nodes too, but it's the panicle coming out of the main stem that's important.

Right: Large blue circle shows one of the flower buds about to come out. Note that they are coming out at the same spot where the leaves come out, known as the node. The nodes are marked with the small blue circles. This arrangement is known as an axillary inflorescence. While these flowers aren't on a stalk (sessile, botanically speaking), sometime the flowers will be borne on a stalk, like on Mexican Ruellia.

Quick and easy-to-understand illustrated glossary of leaf terminology for your convenience

Most of these characteristics can be captured and seen within 1 or two photos. I would do one showing the flowering structure (inflorescence), and one showing the leaves and their texture/hairs. For leaf texture it might be good to note that down, but that's probably a bit excessive.

Here's a few example observations to look at:
Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
Example 4

I will organize the species based on whether the flowers are axilary or in a panicle.


Flowers on a panicle topping the stem


This is the most common of the Ruellias. Well, most common around here... outside of Texas they, occur sparingly in a few other states and down south to Mexico. You wouldn't know living here in Austin though.
The flowers will rise above the leaves in a flowering stalk. Notice how the main stem continues upward and then branches out to form multiple flowers.

The leaves are very oval, with a waxy or glossy look to them. They have hairs (trichomes if I'm being pedantic) but they aren't very conspicuous or particularly dense.


Named after Sister Mary Clare Metz, botanist and professor at Our Lady of the Lake University (OLLU). She has an interesting story, see here for more information.

This species looks pretty much exactly the same as Violet Ruellia... except the flowers are white. Actually, the flowers are also significantly larger than Violet Ruellia so it's useful to have a ruler when taking photos... if you manage to find one. I would actually recommend measuring the calyx lobes though... more on that below.
Flower color is a relatively reliable way of IDing this one, though apparently there is also a white form of Violet Ruellia.
Which makes that common name A LIE!
Well it's mostly not a lie but still
A LIE!!!
Anyhow... Apparently this one is also endemic to Texas, around the Edwards Plataeu. Yes, the Edwards Plateau is very important in Texas botany.

Oh, I forgot how long the corolla was compared to Violet Ruellia... hold on, let me check Shinner's and Mahler's real quick.
...there we go!

R. metziae: corolla (fused petals) 5.5-6.5 cm long, calyx lobes 10-15 mm long when in flower:
R. nudiflora: corolla to 4-5 cm long, calyx lobes 15-20 mm long when in flower
Page 214 of Flora of North Central Texas, found here: https://fwbg.org/research/brit-press/illustrated-flora-of-north-central-texas-online/

So I actually found this species recently, but I wasn't convinced it was R. metziae. So I did a little field research (for fun) and measured the corolla and calyx length for several plants, some R. nudiflora and others supposedly R. metziae. And the results were insane. The Ruellias with white flowers were all significantly larger than those with purple flowers. The calyx lobes were even crazier:


I plucked a Violet Ruellia flower just to make a point

It's not even close! The calyx lobes were almost always reliably longer for R. metziae, by 5 millimeters... which doesn't sound like a lot but it really is.
Here's the calyx with a ruler beside it:

Of course, these are only a few flowers, but I checked several plants so it's no fluke. I highly recommend reading this observation's notes for more information.

All in all, I would highly recommend checking the length of the calyx lobes with a centimeter ruler.
Here's detailed descriptions of both species:
Ruellia metziae
Ruellia nudiflora

Another difference it that this species has long decurrent leaf bases (see the link for more info). What does that mean?

See that long "stem" that I pointed out with the bracket? That's known as the petiole, the part where the leaf connects to the base. Notice how long it is, maybe even half the length of the leaf it's part of! Decurrent is what you see in the red circle, outlined by the purple lines, where the leafy bits of the leaf extends down the petiole. Long decurrent leaf base. The leaves are also a longer sort-of elliptical/oblong shape, and might even look lanceolate. Check the illustrated leaf glossary if you need to check what those mean.
If you look at the Violet Ruellia leaf image above, you can see how the leaves have a much shorter petiole and are more oval/short.

Also note both this one and Violet Ruellia have their flowers on a flowering stalk above the rest of the leaves (aka "terminating the main stem in panicle-like inflorescence")


I initially thought this one was just rare here and occurred more commonly further west of here, but turns out it also only occurs in Texas and further south to Mexico.

This one, like Metz's Ruellia and Violet Ruellia, also has its flowers coming out on a flowering stalk rather than from the leaf nodes (axilary flowers). However, unlike the other two, the leaves are not glossy/waxy, but more of a matte look, similar to Drummond's Ruellia. The leaves are less oval in shape, more tapered towards an ovate/deltoid shape.

The flowering stalk is also densely covered in fine white hairs (canescent).

This species is particularly rare in the Austin area, so if you find it that's a real treat! On iNat there are previous observations seen to the west, in Barton Creek and Emma Long Metro Park.


Flowers coming from the node (axillary)


This is a nonnative species from Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central/South America
It has been widely used as an ornamental and escaped from cultivated, where it is established in several southern states. Considered an invasive in some places, particularly when it gets into riparian areas (areas near water).
Due to the many horticultural cultivars, the leaves can vary quite a bit are distinctly lanceolate (lance-shaped)


Notice how the flowers, while on a stalk, still come out of the leaf nodes

sometimes they even tend to look almost grasslike
(there are several cultivars)


https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/103579832

I see this plant every now and then in nurseries


Named after the great botanist Thomas Drummond, who also has a lot of other plants named after him
hold on was he a botanist
let me check
ah yes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Drummond_(botanist)

there are a lot of Drummonds so they get easily mixed up
anyhow...
Drummond's Ruellia in a Texas endemic - aka, it occurs nowhere else but Texas
as you can see on BONAP.

mostly limited to Edwards Plateau and extending a bit up north to Dallas

From my experience it tends to like shady areas
The leaves are quite distinct:

Ovate, rounded on one end and pointed on the other. They're covered in a lot of very fine hairs, which makes them have a fuzzy feel.
The flowers also come out at the leaf nodes (where the leaf attaches to the stem) rather than coming out as a stalk from the top like Violet Ruellia.


Hairy Ruellia looks similar to Violet Ruellia, but much less common
In fact... I've just realized I've only ever seen it once
However, the leaves are distinctly hairy as the common name actually got that right
Particularly, it has a tell-tale fringe on the leaf margins (edge of the leaf), which is a dead giveaway.

Anotado en 19 de septiembre de 2022 a las 06:57 PM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

30 de agosto de 2022

I casually rant about the differences between Zizotes Milkweed and Silverleaf Nightshade

Zizotes milkweed and Silverleaf nightshade. They look very similar, especially with the wavy leaf margins, fine hairs on the stem and leaves, etc. Doesn't help that they grow around the same time either.

Zizotes Milkweed has opposite leaves, typically coming out at right angles compared to the lower pair. The stacked leaves will create a cross shape:


The cross shape is best seen when looking from above

Silverleaf Nightshade has alternate leaves, which go at angles of 60 degrees or something like that. It also has little thorns on the stem.


See, no crosses!

Leaves on Silverleaf Nightshade tend to be long and thin-ish, like a lance - lanceolate leaves. Those of Zizotes can be lanceolate but are more often oval or ovate.

Some other factors to account for: Zizotes milkweed can take on a reddish/purplish tint sometimes, on the veins or even the entire leaves... I have not seen this on Silverleaf nightshade. Silverleaf nightshade has thorns on the stem, while Zizotes is unarmed.

Lastly, the wavy edge (undulate margins) of Silverleaf Nightshade are very regular/organized... Each "tooth" is about the same size, and not super wavy.
Zizotes margins have no rhyme or reason - they can be there, or not. They can be big undulations, or small ones. Overall, the leaves are very chaotic.


From left to right: not wavy. very wavy. something in between?

The unbelievably variable morphology of this species makes it the hardest species of milkweed to identify (when not in flower, of course)... But there are always clues on every plant that will lead you to the money. It just takes experience.

Zizotes Milkweed will rarely occur in large groups, and rarely blooms in swarms like Antelopehorns, but don't underestimate its hardiness. In a way it is perhaps the weediest of our milkweeds, and if you stare hard enough, it will appear almost anywhere.

Anotado en 30 de agosto de 2022 a las 08:28 PM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 5 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

14 de abril de 2022

Rudimentary Notes on Scutellaria Parvula

Will expand this later, check in FNCT and other sources. I have never seen this species before, so take this information tentatively.

S. drummondii and S. parvula can appear to have similarly sized corollas, and both have longer white hairs on the calyx. Normally it appears that the size of the corolla relative to the calyx is smaller when looking at S. parvula, but other characteristics should be used to verify this species.

The length of the flowering pedicel relative to the calyx
For S. parvula, I've noticed that the flowering pedicel is much more prominent than that of S drummondii. The length of the flowering pedicel is about the same as the length of the calyx. On S. drummondii, the pedicel is inconspicuous and the flowers appear almost to be sessile.

The molted speckles on the corolla
The dark speckles or dots on S. drummondii appear to remain restricted to the white part in the middle. For S. parvula these speckles will more often than not reach outward to the edge of the two front corolla lobes.

The shape of the leaf base
According to Flora of North Central Texas (pg 778-779), S parvula can be distinguished via the leaf base, which are "subcordate to truncate" compared to "rounded for tapering bases" for S. drummondii (and S. wrightii)

Petiole (or, in this case, lack thereof)
S. parvula has sessile leaves, S. drummondii has petioled leaves, albeit winged petioles (leaf tapers and extends along the petiole to the stem).
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/123925798

Anotado en 14 de abril de 2022 a las 02:51 PM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

27 de marzo de 2022

Scutellaria drummondii vs Scutellaria wrightii

I find these two species can sometimes get confused in the Central Texas area... I myself didn't really understand these two very well, but I think I have a basic understanding of how they can be differentiated.


What to take photos of

To get the best evidence to ID these two, I would recommend taking a photo of:

  • a clear side/lateral shot of the flower, with corolla, calyx and stem in focus.
  • an overall shot to show the habit of the plant

Differentiation via the texture of the calyxes

S. drummondii will have long hairs, noticeable pubescence on the calyx ("spreading-pubescent or pilose" as Shiner and Mahler's Flora of North Central Texas says). S. wrightii will have short hairs; any pubescence is inconspicuous to the naked eye ("short-pubescent with inconspicuous hairs"). So far, I have found this to be a reliable characteristic in differentiating the two. However, if the calyxes are very out of focus it can be near impossible to tell.

Differentiation via the shape and orientation of the corolla

S. wrightii usually has a noticeable curve at the base "like a little pipe". The lower half of the corolla also remains very narrow, before it rapidly expands outwards. This also causes the corolla to be flexed upwards, so that it projects perpendicular to the calyx and almost vertical in orientation.
S. drummondii appears to lack this feature, projecting close to horizontal from the stem, and widens more gradually from the base, forming a sideways V-shape.


Differentiation via the size of the corolla relative to the leaves

This is from my own personal observations, and I question the reliability of this method, so take this information with a grain of salt.
S. drummondii tends to have a corolla size that is not much larger than the surrounding leaves—at most I would say 1 1/2 times larger.
S. wrightii appears to have a corolla size that can often exceed the size of the leaves by a lot. This might be because the leaves at the end of the stems are younger and smaller than the base, and the large flowers tend to be clustered near the top. Or that since the corolla curves upward, it tends to extend up past a leaf node (or even two). Flowers further down the stem can be more proportional in size to the leaves. But often when looking at the plant, especially when well into bloom, the flowers really tend to dominate the scene.


Differentiation via the habit

When the plant is mature, the stems of S. wrightii are often densely clustered together, forming a tighter clump than S. drummondii does. S. wrightii is also a perennial—a woody perennial. On older plants, there will often be dead stems from previous seasons still visible. S drummondii is an annual, and, as far as I have seen, does not form woody stems.


Differentiation via surrounding soil

Alone this may not be a definitive ID feature, but it is a good clue.
S. wrightii is a inhabitant of poor, dry soils, often rocky and surrounded by bits of limestone. The soil color will usually be quite light in color. Apparently it can also be found on sandy soils as well. S. drummondii is less picky and will grow in clay and loam soils as well as sandy and limestone soils. You will probably not find S. wrightii growing on clay or loam... perhaps that's why it remains mostly limited to the Edward's Plateau... though its range does stretch upwards towards Dallas and Oklahoma.


Example observations:
S. drummondii:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3020196
S. wrightii:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4088602

Resources:
https://fwbg.org/research/brit-press/illustrated-flora-of-north-central-texas-online/ - Dicots: Fabaceae to Zygophyliaceae, page 778
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/75992067#identification-84b1d42a-0054-4f8c-8f47-90742f13d4fc
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/22646848

Also with the amount of times these can get mistaken for Texas Sage (Check out the Dave's Garden plant file!) I should add in a separate note about how to distinguish those too, but I can do that later.

Anotado en 27 de marzo de 2022 a las 04:30 AM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 4 observaciones | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

16 de marzo de 2022

Smilax bona-nox vs Smilax rotundifolia

This is a quick post to remind me of how to distinguish these two Smilax species. With Smilax rotundifolia, it's less of a case of finding characteristics to look for, but more of looking for characteristics that would rule it out.


Differentiation via thorns on leaf nodes

Smilax bona-nox will have thorns at leaf/tendril nodes (Smilax glauca will also exhibit this characteristic). Smilax rotundifolia will not. If there are thorns at the leaf nodes, then it's NOT Smilax rotundifolia.


Differentiation via leaf margins

Smilax bona-nox has prickles along the leaf margins, which I suppose is where it got its common name "Saw Greenbrier." On some specimens this can be quite obvious, while on others they exhibit no prickles at all. However, prickles on the leaf margin will rule out S. rotundifolia. It is good practice to check multiple leaves for any prickles.

Smilax rotundifolia often has a "minute roughness" on the leaf margin. This is one of the best characteristics to look for... though it can be hard to see or photograph. Not every S. rotundifolia plant will exhibit this, but it is pretty consistent. Besides prickles, S. bona-nox margins will be completely smooth to the touch, and can also have a "cartilaginous edge" - a cream colored border.

Note: S. tamnoides, the bristly greenbrier, also exhibits this minute roughness, so always check to see if you can find the needle thin, black prickles so you don't mix those up too.


Differentiation via leaf petiole color

Smilax rotundifolia tends to have pinkish coloration on its petioles, while Smilax bona-nox will have green petioles. If a specimen exibits a pinkish color on the leaf petioles, that is a good reason to lean towards S. rotundifolia


Differentiation via leaf shape, texture, etc.

I do not think these characteristics are as reliable as the other ones, but will list them anyways.
Smilax bona-nox leaves can have a three-lobed appearance. This can be more or less prominent on specimens, but if the plant is distinctly three-lobed that rules out S. rotundifolia.
Smilax bona-nox will also have "tougher, leatherier leaves," while Smilax rotundifolia has a brighter shine to it. Young leaves of both species tend to look shiny though so this probably applies better with mature leaves.
Smilax bona-nox often have light splotches on its leaves. Seldom will you find this on S. rotundiflolia, if at all.


Differentiation via number of seeds in berry

Smilax bona-nox will consistently have one big seed in each berry
Smilax rotundifolia will have 2-3 seeds per berry



Example observations:
S. bona-nox
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/10823410
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/9163238
S. rotundifolia
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/38340084
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/23535086

Set of observations with disagreements between these species: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?ident_taxon_id_exclusive=125677,60746&order_by=votes&place_id=1&verifiable=any

Resources:
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/fr375
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/24538904#activity_comment_1344649a-4a64-4a3e-82e5-aa40689f20d6

Anotado en 16 de marzo de 2022 a las 01:02 AM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

26 de enero de 2022

Giliastrum spp.

Common in Texas:

  • Bluebowls (Giliastrum rigidulum)
  • Splitleaf Gilia (Giliastrum incisum)
  • Bluebowls (Giliastrum acerosum)

Distinguishing these taxa

G. rigidulum and G. acerosum will tend to have a deeper blue corolla, size around 10mm overall.
Both will have deciduous basal leaves that are not persistent.

G. acerosum occurs further west, In Trans-Pecos and the Plains., leaves acerose or needle shaped with thin linear divisions
G.rigidulum limited to the Edwards Plateau area, leaves are NOT acerose and divisions of the leaf are broader.

G. incisum has distinct basal leaves that are simple or "deeply serrate," size of corolla 4-7 mm

Key: https://polemoniaceae.wordpress.com/giliastrum/

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4077866

Anotado en 26 de enero de 2022 a las 10:19 PM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 1 observación | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

16 de enero de 2022

30 de diciembre de 2021

Identifying plants - Advice from Nathan's Identifier profile

https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/56161-identifier-profile-nathantaylor

http://floranorthamerica.org/Ageratina
http://www.bonap.org/

Looking up specimens:
iNaturalist observations/images in general are not very reliable, so try to use specimens.
https://plants.jstor.org/ but I'm not in college yet so I don't have an account =(((
https://www.gbif.org/species/search?q=

Anotado en 30 de diciembre de 2021 a las 06:08 PM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

28 de diciembre de 2021

List of Common Replies for ID'ing

In an attempt to help more people, I am creating a list of replies for common comments I'll make on an observation. I care about all the newer iNatters out there and want to help them out the best I can in a courteous and kind manner... as a scout should do!

Also... Helpful Identification Guides

Also, here's a list of helpful identification guides: https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/lisa281/31012-helpful-identification-guides
Hopefully you've found this already, it comes in handy every now and then!

~

Also, you appear quite new to the site, so here's a handy list of helpful identification guides: https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/lisa281/31012-helpful-identification-guides
I find it useful every now and then!

Cultivated plant

-Possibly/Definitely cultivated-

Is this a cultivated plant?

Unfortunately, the wild/cultivated distinction in iNaturalist is an obscure thing. A lot of people don't figure it out when they first upload observations (like me!).

Let me take an excerpt out of my "Helpful Tips and Resources for Beginner (Plant) iNatters":

"People will take picture of ornamental flowers in garden beds, planted trees, potted succulents. That's completely fine! Sometimes I'll find an interesting cultivated plant and want to know what that is. With these plants, however, you should mark them captive/cultivated, so that they'll be casual observations. iNaturalist is focused on wild organisms, and a plant in a garden placed there by a human is not Research Grade material. If you're confused on what counts as captive/cultivated, iNaturalist has definitions and examples here: https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/help#captive"

Also, take a look at this if you want to (https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/arnanthescout/57230-helpful-tips-and-resources-for-beginner-plant-inatters) for some tips for iNatting with plants!

Hope you find this helpful!

~

Is this a cultivated plant?

Unfortunately, the wild/cultivated distinction in iNaturalist is an obscure thing. A lot of people don't figure it out when they first upload observations.

I know. No one ever told me either.

Let me take an excerpt out of my "Helpful Tips and Resources for Beginner (Plant) iNatters":

"People will take picture of ornamental flowers in garden beds, planted trees, potted succulents. That's completely fine! Sometimes I'll find an interesting cultivated plant and want to know what that is. With these plants, however, you should mark them captive/cultivated, so that they'll be casual observations. iNaturalist is focused on wild organisms, and a plant in a garden placed there by a human is not Research Grade material. If you're confused on what counts as captive/cultivated, iNaturalist has definitions and examples here: https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/help#captive"

Also, take a look at this if you want to (https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/arnanthescout/57230-helpful-tips-and-resources-for-beginner-plant-inatters) for some tips for iNatting with plants!

Hope you find this helpful!

Rubus

Can be hard to differentiate, but if you know what to look for/take photos of it is possible to bring these to species. See https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/kimberlietx/30266-key-to-rubus-spp-of-texas-dewberries-blackberries-and-brambles for info on distinguishing Texas species.

Callirhoe

~May have features visible~

These are really similar and can be hard to ID to species... but only if you don't know what to look for (and photograph)
I'm not sure if there's enough info in these pictures to get this to a species ID...

...but see this guide https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/54356-a-short-guide-to-callirhoe-in-texas if you want to get your Callirhoe observations to RG!

~

These are really similar and can be hard to ID to species... but only if you don't know what to look for (and photograph)

...see this guide https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/54356-a-short-guide-to-callirhoe-in-texas if you want to get your Callirhoe observations to RG.

~Doesn't have features visible~

These are really similar and can be hard to ID to species... but only if you don't know what to look for (and photograph)
I don't think there's enough in here to get this to a species ID...

...but see this guide https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/54356-a-short-guide-to-callirhoe-in-texas if you want to get your Callirhoe observations to RG!

Winged vs Cedar

Turns out, Winged Elm is not the only elm with wings... ;D
"In a better, simpler world, all elms with wings would be Winged Elms, but this is not the case."

Typically, Winged Elm has more pointed leaves (botany speech: acuminate apex)
See here for more detailed info: https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/lisa281/20574-the-elm-project-part-3-cedar-elm-vs-winged-elm%0A

Juniperus

Junipers are one of the very few times it's useful to get a broader photo of the entire tree.

Ashe Juniper usually follows the Balconnes escarpment, and Eastern Red Cedar goes towards the East. Luckily, (or unluckily), they overlap right around the Central Texas Region :D

Ashe juniper will be more bush-like, branching off from the bottom to create a giant globular bush.
Easter Red Cedar will be more conifer tree-like (think Christmas tree), having a main trunk with the branches coming out.

There are some other more obscure characteristics as well, but that's one of the easier ways.

Anemone

It's definitely an anemone! We have many species here in Texas, and they can be hard to tell apart. Will wait and see if someone else can ID.

If you want to get more in-depth with how to take pictures of these for a higher chance of species ID, see here: https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/pfau_tarleton/20891

~

We have many species here in Texas, and while there's a pretty high chance this is A. berlandieri, it can be hard to be certain. Who knows, maybe it could be one of the rarer ones...

If you want to get more in-depth with how to take pictures of these for a higher chance of species ID, see here: https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/pfau_tarleton/20891

Geraniums

Can be difficult to get these to species... but if you find these flowering though, a clear picture of the flower helps a lot!

Anotado en 28 de diciembre de 2021 a las 01:23 AM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

26 de diciembre de 2021

Notes on Darcy's Sage

https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/475236-Salvia-darcyi
https://www.calfloranursery.com/plants/salvia-darcyi
https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=2421
https://www.plantdelights.com/products/salvia-darcyi
https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/106615/
http://prairiebreak.blogspot.com/2012/09/burning-bush-salvia-darcyi.html

From Wikipedia, 12 December 2021:

"Salvia darcyi is a herbaceous perennial shrub native to a very small area at 9000 ft elevation in the eastern range of the Mexican Sierra Madre Oriental. Discovered in the wild in 1991, it has since been sold in horticulture under several names. Botanist James Compton named the plant after fellow British botanist John d'Arcy after a trip they made to the region in 1991.

Salvia darcyi reaches 3 feet in height, with stoloniferous roots that spread over time and deltoid pastel green leaves that are very sticky. The bright coral red flowers are 1.5 inches long on inflorescences that reach up to 2 feet."

From "Prairiebreak" blog:

"I have referred to Salvia darcyi glancingly in many posts over the last few years. Perhaps it's time to grasp the thistle (so to speak) and acknowledge this uber-sage, this conflagration, this burning bush of garden plants. Just a few days ago, Mark Kane (an old gardening friend and great horticulturist) commented casually as we strolled past a planting of this sage at DBG) that he was with Carl Schoenfeld and John Fairey (of the famed Yucca Do and Peckerwood Garden) in 1988 in Nuevo Leon when they first collected this taxon: at the time they thought it was Salvia oresbia. A few years later James Compton and William D'Arcy accompanied the Yucca Do meisters to the same spot, and the plant was subsequently named (or renamed?...I am not sure Charles Christopher Parry's collection of S. oresbia in 1878 might not be the same plant incidentally--which would wreak a bit of nomenclatural havoc...)"

From San Marcos Grower's website:

"This plant was originally discovered by Carl Schoenfeld and John Fairey of Yucca Do Nursery near Galena, Mexico, in 1988 and in 1991 they guided a British expedition that included British botanist James Compton to a site where it was found growing along a rocky limestone ravine at 9,000 feet in the Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range. Though originally called Salvia oresbia, Compton officially described it in a 1994 issue of the journal of Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, naming it after Canadian born botanist William G. D'Arcy, who accompanied him on the collection trip and so it is also commonly called Darcy's sage."

Primary source? https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8748.1994.tb00406.x
Curtis's Botanical Magazine, Volume 11, Issue 2. May 1994.
ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION by Compton: "Herbs to 1.5m or more; stems and leaves densely glandular-pubescent; inflorescence whorls with 4-6 flowers... S. darcyi"

Names:
Carl Schoenfeld
https://www.texaslegacy.org/narrator/carl-schoenfeld/
John Fairey
https://jfgarden.org/about/
http://www.kleinfuneralhome.com/obituary/john-fairey
Owners of Yucca Do Nursery
Main initiators on the "Yucca Do Expeditions," a series of excursions into the remote Mexican mountains. Their interest in the area came from an initial trip in 1988 with Lynn Lowery, where they gained their fascination with the region and its plants.

Info on one of their expeditions https://www.juniperlevelbotanicgarden.org/content/learn/expeditions/1994_mexico/

James Compton
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/James-Compton-5
https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/James_A._Compton
William G. D'Arcy - The plant is named after him
http://www.efloras.org/person_profile.aspx?person_id=1444

Lynn Lowery, horticulturalist and plant explorer
https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/heroes/lowrey2.html
https://www.texaslegacy.org/narrator/carl-schoenfeld/ Carl Schoenberg discusses his impressions of Lynn Lowery in an interview

Locations:
Denver Botanical Gardens
Galena, Mexico/Sierra Madre
Yucca Do Nursery
John Fairey Garden/Peckerfield Garden - https://jfgarden.org/ and https://www.gardenconservancy.org/preservation/preservation-news/peckerwood-nursery-opening

The last two are the same location, the Peckerfield Garden was apparently built over where the Yucca Do Nursery used to be.

Noticed:
-Longer petiole than Tropical Sage
-Scabrous texture, "papery" as described in an iNat observation
-"Pastel" green color
-Leaf deltoid, cordate base tapering inward to an attenuate margin
-Height of plant is quite tall, 3-4 feet?
-Some sort-of distinct aroma associated with it - a "pleasant aroma" as San Marcos Growers say, "herbaceous cat urine" as described in an iNat observation, or "sulfur" as a commenter on Prairiebreak blog suggests.
-Large prolific blooms, long blooming season

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/98352372
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95174441
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/96689402

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95557248

Synonym Salvia oresbia?

Anotado en 26 de diciembre de 2021 a las 05:10 AM por arnanthescout arnanthescout | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario