Diario del proyecto Alaska Forest Health Observations

26 de septiembre de 2022

Upcoming virtual event, this Wednesday! Spruce beetle semiochemical webinar with Dr. Jackson Audley, USFS

Interested in learning more about ongoing spruce beetle research in Alaska? Dr. Jackson Audley, researcher with the U.S. Forest Service, will be joining us at 5pm on September 28th, 2022 to present his recent research into semiochemical repellants for spruce beetle in Alaska. Semiochemicals are chemical signals produced by animals or plants that affect the behavior of other organisms. Jackson and his colleagues with the U.S. Forest Service and Alaska Division of Forestry & Fire Protection have been working to identify whether some of these compounds, such as those produced by non-host trees or by other species of bark beetles, may chemically camouflage spruce trees in a way that prevents the tree from being attacked and killed by spruce beetles. Join us to hear more about how Jackson evaluates spruce beetle response to semiochemicals in both Alaska and the Rocky Mountains.

This webinar is hosted by the UAF Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Registration is free and open to the public. The webinar will be held virtually over Zoom, follow the link below to register for this virtual event: https://www.alaskasprucebeetle.org/upcoming-events/

Anotado en 26 de septiembre de 2022 a las 09:43 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

20 de septiembre de 2022

USFS Forest Health is hiring! Deadline to apply is September 30th

The US Forest Service will be filling several permanent seasonal positions in the Alaska Region through an Open Continuous Recruitment effort, including positions that support Forest Health Protection. These positions perform a variety of field, office, and laboratory tasks that support the mission of the Forest Service. Please share this information with anyone who may be interested!

Forest Health will be evaluating potential candidates from the two listings below. Please note the closing date of September 30, 2022. Other positions within the agency will be hired using the same vacancy announcements. Additional vacancy announcements for similar positions can be found at www.USAjobs.gov

1: Open to anyone who has lived or worked in or near the geographic boundaries of Southcentral or Southeast Alaska and has special knowledge or expertise concerning the cultural and/or resources of at least one of these areas: https://www.usajobs.gov/job/653199000

2: Open to the public: https://www.usajobs.gov/job/653197700

A webinar recording is available with more information and details about navigating the Forest Service hiring process and can be viewed here: https://vimeo.com/showcase/9309003/video/707052737

Anotado en 20 de septiembre de 2022 a las 06:41 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

12 de septiembre de 2022

Annual Alaska Invasive Species Workshop November 1-3

Registration is open for the Alaska Invasive Species Workshop, held November 1-3 this year. There are both in-person and virtual registration options, with the in-person event being held in Anchorage this year. The workshop is a forum for discussing invasive species management activities within the state, offers expert presentations about emerging invasive species science and management issues, highlights outreach efforts, and offers training for new and experienced invasive species managers alike. The workshop typically draws 100 to 150 participants. For more information and to register visit the webpage at: https://alaskainvasives.org/?page_id=134

Anotado en 12 de septiembre de 2022 a las 04:12 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

09 de septiembre de 2022

Fall 2022 Alaska Biodiversity Bioblitz

Fall 2022 Alaska Biodiversity Bioblitz starts next week! All observations recorded between September 15-18 2022 will count toward the project, join the project here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/fall-2022-alaska-biodiversity-challenge

Any of your observations made for the bioblitz that are also relevant to the Alaska Forest Health Observations project will be included in both!

Remember that it can be very helpful to include the host plant information when uploading insects or pathogens of trees and shrubs. Some fungi and insect larvae only live and grow on certain species of plants, so knowing which plant the organism is living on can help us identify it. An easy way to add host plant information to your post is to name the plant species in the notes section of your observation. If you don't know the species of plant that's ok, but adding the general group of plants can be helpful too! For example, if you know it's a spruce, but aren't sure which one, feel free to just put 'spruce'. If the tree bark is degraded and you're not sure if it's birch or aspen, but you know it's not a conifer species, you can designate the host as 'hardwood'. Notes about the tree species is very helpful for us, so we appreciate you including it! A more advanced way to add host information is to scroll down to the field on the lower right hand side of your observation labeled "Observation fields" (this field is located below "Annotations" and "Projects"). In the box, type and click on "Host Plant ID" and type in the species of plant!

Thank you for contributing your observations to iNaturalist!

Anotado en 09 de septiembre de 2022 a las 08:13 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

07 de septiembre de 2022

Free webinar - Spruce beetle semiochemical research with Dr. Jackson Audley, USFS

Interested in learning more about ongoing spruce beetle research in Alaska? Dr. Jackson Audley, researcher with the U.S. Forest Service, will be joining us at 5pm on September 28th, 2022 to present his recent research into semiochemical repellants for spruce beetle in Alaska. Semiochemicals are chemical signals produced by animals or plants that affect the behavior of other organisms. Jackson and his colleagues with the U.S. Forest Service and Alaska Division of Forestry & Fire Protection have been working to identify whether some of these compounds, such as those produced by non-host trees or by other species of bark beetles, may chemically camouflage spruce trees in a way that prevents the tree from being attacked and killed by spruce beetles. Join us to hear more about how Jackson evaluates spruce beetle response to semiochemicals in both Alaska and the Rocky Mountains.

This webinar is hosted by the UAF Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Registration is free and open to the public. The webinar will be held virtually over Zoom, follow the link below to register for this virtual event: https://www.alaskasprucebeetle.org/upcoming-events/

Anotado en 07 de septiembre de 2022 a las 10:27 PM por awenninger awenninger | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

31 de agosto de 2022

Moths take flight after causing extensive defoliation across Southeast Alaska

USFS press release regarding the current blackheaded budworm outbreak in Southeast Alaska: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r10/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD1057047

JUNEAU, Alaska – Aug. 29, 2022 - Residents and visitors may notice a lot of small brownish-gray moths fluttering around. Western blackheaded budworms are transforming from voracious caterpillars into moths and are emerging throughout the area. These caterpillars, which were abundant in July and August, are responsible for causing the needles on hemlock and spruce trees to turn reddish-brown.

Not to worry - while heavy concentrations of feeding activity from western blackheaded budworm caterpillars can lead to the loss of trees, most will recover. The forest may look different following an event of this size, but these defoliator outbreaks have happened before, and the forests will benefit in the long-term through sunlight breaks in the canopy and fertilization from droppings and half-eaten needles. Additionally, the caterpillars are a food source for hungry birds and fish.

The current outbreak began in 2020 in the central Tongass area and then expanded across southeast Alaska, reaching as far north as Haines and as far south as Ketchikan in 2022. Western blackheaded budworm outbreaks typically last 2-3 years before ending naturally.

Forest visitors can upload photos, video, or information related to sightings of the insect or its damage to iNaturalist.com, which will automatically be included in the Alaska Forest Health Observations Project, a citizen science project in iNaturalist. More information on the project can be found here.

The last time a major western blackheaded budworm outbreak in the southeast took place was from 1992 to 1995.

For more information visit the Forest Health website. Alaska’s National Forests – where nature, people, and tradition come together.

Anotado en 31 de agosto de 2022 a las 09:31 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Birch Leafminer Outbreak - Interior and Southcentral AK

Have you noticed the birch leaves yellowing a bit early this year? Check out this press release from the US Forest Service regarding the current birch leafminer outbreak in Alaska: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r10/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD1057235

FAIRBANKS, Alaska – Aug. 30, 2022 – Birch tree leaves in Interior and Southcentral Alaska have turned brown prematurely due to an ongoing outbreak of two birch leafminer invasive species, the amber-marked birch leafminer and the late birch leaf edgeminer.

As larvae, birch leafminers live in and eat the insides of birch leaves, causing them to turn yellowish-brown and prematurely drop before the fall season. During an outbreak, up to 90 percent of the leaves on a tree can be defoliated. The extensive defoliation by the larvae has resulted in browning birch tops observed in hillsides and along roadways, which has raised concerns about a hastening to fall as well as public concern for the state of birch trees in outbreak areas.

Residents may soon notice large amounts of larvae on the ground near birch trees or collecting on property sitting under birch branches. After summer feeding, birch leafminer larvae drop to the ground, and spend the winter in a cocoon, emerging as adult sawflies the following spring.

Damage by birch leafminer is primarily aesthetic and tree death has not been observed in Alaska so far. Repeated damage, however, can result in declining tree-growth rates and weakened trees that are susceptible to damage by secondary diseases and forest pests.

Forest visitors can help the Forest Service track the birch leafminers by uploading photos, video, or information on sightings or damage to iNaturalist.com, which will automatically be included in the Alaska Forest Health Observations Project, a citizen science project in iNaturalist. More information on the project can be found here.

For more information visit the Forest Health website.

Alaska’s National Forests – where nature, people, and tradition come together. Follow Alaska’s National Forests on Facebook and Twitter. For a wealth of information about the Alaska Region, visit our media toolkit.

Anotado en 31 de agosto de 2022 a las 09:28 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

07 de junio de 2022

European bird cherry in bloom

European bird cherry, aka Mayday tree, is blooming. They are pretty, but invasive! These trees can displace native willows, alter fish & wildlife habitat, and are toxic to moose.

Photo courtesy of Josh Hightower.

Learn more: https://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/wp-content/uploads/Prunus_padus_BIO_PRPA5.pdf

Anotado en 07 de junio de 2022 a las 04:51 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

06 de junio de 2022

Alaska Biodiversity Challenge 2022 Bioblitz!

Share your forest health observations with the Alaska Biodiversity Challenge 2022 Bioblitz!

When: 12:01AM Thursday June 9, to the stroke of midnight Sunday, June 12, 2022. Observations must be made during that 4-day time period, but they can be submitted to iNaturalist up to the end of the day, June 19, 2022.

To read more or join the bioblitz visit here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/alaska-biodiversity-challenge-2022

Anotado en 06 de junio de 2022 a las 10:46 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

29 de abril de 2022

Bear scratching and trees

Bear scratch fever! Bears mark, scratch & even feed on the inner bark of trees in spring. Wounds create entry points for stem decays, which can eventually develop into decay hollows for future den habitat! You scratch my tree, I’ll scratch yours. #BearAware #AlaskaForestHealth

Anotado en 29 de abril de 2022 a las 05:01 PM por awenninger awenninger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario