Archivos de Diario para junio 2017

18 de junio de 2017

Search iNaturalist Vermont by Towns

You can search and track the observations and species in any Vermont town, ideal for town conservation commissions, students, town planners and naturalists. A few years old but still a good tutorial, watch our short screencast about this exciting tool.

Anotado en junio 18, domingo 18:59 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 6 comentarios | Deja un comentario

02 de junio de 2017

May 2017 iNaturalist Vermont Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulations to Charlotte Bill for winning the May 2017 iNaturalist Vermont photo-observation of the month contest. Her images of a Moose were the most popular photo-observation as measured by clicked ‘favs’.

Mostly lost from New England due to hunting and habitat change in the 1800s, moose populations began to rebound in the late 1970s. Recently, populations have been declining once again - this time from parasites and disease. Warmer and shorter winters are allowing Winter Ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) to thrive. These parasites, possibly combined with others like lungworm, are responsible for the premature deaths of  ~70 percent of moose calves in Maine and New Hampshire. A single moose can have 75,000 ticks on it. The ticks can be so dense and bothersome that that a moose will rub large areas of fur off itself in an attempt at relief. But not the one in Charlotte Bill's image. That patchiness is likely just from shedding and rubbing the winter coat away. This moose looks like a healthy young bull.

Visit iNaturalist Vermont, a project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, and you can vote for the winner this month by clicking ‘fav’ on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you and submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Anotado en junio 02, viernes 00:34 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

12 de junio de 2017

Moth Night in Bennington on June 15th

June 15, 2017, Vermont Moths, One World Conservation Center, 413 VT Rte. 7 South, Bennington, Vermont, 7 PM, Moths are much more than the pesky insects attracted to porch lights in the spring, summer and fall. Take a journey into the darkness with JoAnne Russo and Laura Gaudette and learn more about these nighttime jewels! This program will begin at the education center with a powerpoint presentation and move to the Greenberg Reserve for an interactive experience with moths. Bring flashlights and a lawn chair if you like. Admission at door: $5 Members $3 See http://oneworldconservationcenter.org/

Anotado en junio 12, lunes 12:26 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

06 de junio de 2017

Vermont Atlas of Life Workshop on June 8th

On Thursday, June 8th join Kent McFarland at the Green Mountain Club Visitor Center on Route 100 in Waterbury, Vermont and learn about the Vermont Atlas of Life and how anyone can contribute to it. Get a demonstration of how to gather and enter basic observations from the field in Vermont eBird, eButterfly, and iNaturalist Vermont. See how simple and fun sharing what you observe around your home or on the trails can be. Downloading these apps on your phone or tablet and bringing along your device to practice is encouraged, but not required. Visit the Stowe Land Trust website for more information and to register.

Anotado en junio 06, martes 15:48 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

13 de junio de 2017

Vermont Damselfly and Dragonfly Atlas of Vermont Workshop June 17

The Vermont Damselfly and Dragonfly Atlas (VDDA) will hold a workshop on Saturday, June 17, from 10AM to 2PM in Montpelier. Here’s your opportunity to either discover these audacious insects or improve your field skills with them. We’ll meet at North Branch Nature Center for a short slide presentation, and then we’ll head out with binoculars, cameras and nets. It’s all free of charge in the interest of advancing our knowledge of Odonata in Vermont and learning how to use iNaturalist Vermont. If you’d like to attend, send an email to bryan@bryanpfeiffer.com and he’ll send you more details. This seems to be shaping up into a nice week: moths on June 15 and dragonflies on June 17. Here’s the atlas site: http://val.vtecostudies.org/projects/vermont-damselfly-and-dragonfly-atlas/

Anotado en junio 13, martes 14:36 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

14 de junio de 2017

Countdown to 150,000 Observations

With less than 700 observations to go, which iNaturalist Vermont user will be the lucky one to add the 150,000th observation to the popular site? iNaturalist Vermont has grown leaps and bounds. With over 1,600 people contributing observations and over 3,700 species of plants and animals reported and confirmed, iNaturalist Vermont is quickly becoming the largest biodiversity database ever assembled for Vermont.

Just one year ago, with a tap on his smartphone and a click to submit to iNaturalist Vermont, Charlie Hohn added the 100,000th record, a beautiful Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid. It was fitting that Charlie made the landmark observation, with nearly 17,000 photo-observations added to the project comprising 1,381 species, Charlie is one of the leaders (and evangelist!) for this project and iNaturalist as a whole.

The idea for iNaturalist Vermont, a project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, started with a simple question. How many species occur in Vermont and where are they? You’d think we’d know this for a small state steeped in a rich tradition of naturalists dating back to Zadock Thompson and his seminal 1842 work on the natural history of Vermont. But, the simple answer was, no one really knew.

We do know how many species there are of some of the popular taxonomic groups like birds (currently 385) and mammals (58). But how many invertebrates are there in Vermont? A back-of-the-envelope estimate puts the number at just over 21,400 species! There are about 2,150 species of vascular plants, with approximately 1,400 native plants. Not including protists, bacteria or viruses, we humans share Vermont with at least 26,000 to 45,000 species, although no one knows for sure just how many.

The list continues to grow as we discover new native and introduced species across the state. For example, citizen naturalists helped the Vermont Butterfly Survey (2002-2007) discover 12 new butterflies in the state, in the process creating a conservation watch list based on our newfound knowledge. We don’t have to go far to discover new and surprising species. A new plant, never before described to science, was recently discovered in the Green Mountains.

Join our growing community of citizen naturalists from around the Green Mountain State in discovering and sharing observations of Vermont life. Your observations can be turned into research-grade, citizen science data that will help us discover, track and ultimately conserve our natural heritage.

Anotado en junio 14, miércoles 13:17 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

25 de junio de 2017

iNaturalist Vermont Records 150,000th Biodiversity Observation

With a tap on his smartphone and a click to submit to iNaturalist Vermont, Noel Dodge added the 150,000th record, a Black Ash tree growing near Otter Creek. iNaturalist Vermont has grown leaps and bounds. With over 1,600 people contributing observations and over 3,700 species of plants and animals reported and confirmed, iNaturalist Vermont is quickly becoming the largest biodiversity database ever assembled for Vermont.

The idea for iNaturalist Vermont, a project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, started with a simple question. How many species occur in Vermont and where are they? You’d think we’d know this for a small state steeped in a rich tradition of naturalists dating back to Zadock Thompson and his seminal 1842 work on the natural history of Vermont. But, the simple answer was, no one really knew.

We do know how many species there are of some of the popular taxonomic groups like birds (currently 385) and mammals (58). But how many invertebrates are there in Vermont? A back-of-the-envelope estimate puts the number at just over 21,400 species! There are about 2,150 species of vascular plants, with approximately 1,400 native plants. Not including protists, bacteria or viruses, we humans share Vermont with at least 26,000 to 45,000 species, although no one knows for sure just how many.

The list continues to grow as we discover new native and introduced species across the state. For example, citizen naturalists helped the Vermont Butterfly Survey (2002-2007) discover 12 new butterflies in the state, in the process creating a conservation watch list based on our newfound knowledge. We don’t have to go far to discover new and surprising species.

Can we hit 200,000 observations by the end of the year?


Join our growing community of naturalists from around the Green Mountain State in discovering and sharing observations of Vermont's biodiversity. Your observations can be turned into research-grade, citizen science data that will help us discover, track and ultimately conserve our natural heritage.

Anotado en junio 25, domingo 01:42 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

30 de junio de 2017

June 2017 Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulations to Joshua Lincoln for winning the June 2017 iNaturalist Vermont photo-observation of the month contest. His Pine Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis ssp. pini) image was the most popular photo-observation as measured by clicked ‘favs’.

The 1995 landmark publication Moths and Butterflies of Vermont: A Faunal Checklist, noted a specimen in the Carl T. Parsons Entomological Collection at UVM from July 1893, and reported that It was apparently last seen in Vermont in 1934. The iNaturalist Vermont database now has three records, including a caterpillar that was found feeding on Red Cedar, potentially a new host plant for this moth.
Adults reported to emerge before sunrise and mate after midnight the next day. Females lay eggs at dusk on host plant leaves. The eggs hatch in about two weeks, and the caterpillars are solitary feeders. The Pine Imperial moth is a conifer-feeding subspecies. Pupation takes place in underground burrows.

Visit iNaturalist Vermont, a project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, and you can vote for the winner this month by clicking ‘fav’ on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you and submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Anotado en junio 30, viernes 19:14 por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario