Archivos de Diario para junio 2022

01 de junio de 2022

Project Dragonfly Webinar FAQs

Hundreds of questions were submitted for our Project Dragonfly webinar! We only had time to answer a handful during the live event, and now have addressed many others in a webinar FAQ, which you can read here. Check it out now to learn more about topics like how dragonflies feed, what attracts them, their lifecycle and helpful resources.

Want more? Be sure to check out our Ten Favourite Facts from the Project Dragonfly Webinar. And if you couldn’t watch the webinar live, you can still watch the recording here.

bluets photo by bobmcd
Pictured: a damselfly in the bluets genus observed by bobmcd.

Anotado en 01 de junio de 2022 a las 03:31 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

03 de junio de 2022

Observation of the Week: Blue Dasher

This week's feature is a blue dasher, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user brithikesontario in southern Ontario. Blue dashers are aggressive predators and will eat hundreds of flying insects a day; up to ten per cent of their body weight!

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Today and for the next two weeks, our Observation of the Week photographer will win a special prize! You need to be a member of Project Dragonfly on iNaturalist to be chosen, so join now!

dragonfly macro by brithikesontario

Anotado en 03 de junio de 2022 a las 12:22 PM por ckosheluk ckosheluk | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

07 de junio de 2022

Recenser les libellules rares du Canada

Les bassins hydrographiques du Canada constituent des habitats essentiels pour certaines des espèces de libellules les plus menacées. En raison de leur rareté, ces insectes sont parfois difficiles à repérer. Or, grâce aux citoyens ordinaires qui recensent leurs rares observations sur les plateformes gratuites de la science citoyenne comme iNaturalist, ces espèces et leurs habitats sont recensés et peuvent être conservés.

Veuillez cliquer sur ce lien pour prendre connaissance de deux rares espèces de libellules, découvertes et enregistrées par un naturaliste dans d’importants sites de milieux humides au Canada.

hines emerald dragonfly
Libellule cordulie de Hine © Paul Burton/USFWS

Anotado en 07 de junio de 2022 a las 06:09 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Documenting Canada’s Rare Dragonflies

Canada’s wetlands provide critical habitat for some of our most threatened species of dragonflies. Because of their rarity, these creatures can be challenging to track. But thanks to everyday citizens, who are documenting their sightings on platforms like iNaturalist, these species and their habitat are being documented and can be conserved.

Click here to read about the discoveries of two rare species of dragonflies, recorded at important Canadian wetland sites by naturalist.

hines emerald dragonfly
Hine's emerald dragonfly. © Paul Burton/USFWS

Anotado en 07 de junio de 2022 a las 06:12 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

10 de junio de 2022

Observation of the Week: Frosted Whiteface

This week's feature is a frosted whiteface, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user kells3 near Edmonton, AB. The frosted whiteface is a small skimmer - usually 3-3.5cm long. Its colouring varies by age and sex.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Today and next week, our Observation of the Week photographer will win a special prize! You need to be a member of Project Dragonfly on iNaturalist to be chosen, so join now!

dragonfly macro by kells3

Anotado en 10 de junio de 2022 a las 07:29 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

14 de junio de 2022

Save a Dragonfly Nursery

save a dragonfly nursery

Right now, young dragonflies are growing up in wetlands across Canada. A single female dragonfly can lay thousands of eggs in a wetland—which can take months or even years to become adults.

For dragonfly eggs and larvae, that wetland is their entire world. And when it’s destroyed? Her offspring are lost, along with every generation that should follow.

Here’s where you come in. When you donate just $50 or more, you can save habitat that will be home to countless generations of emerging dragonflies long into the future, along with hundreds of other wildlife species.

Act now to save a dragonfly nursery.

Anotado en 14 de junio de 2022 a las 08:10 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Quelle est votre meilleure observation jusqu’à maintenant?

À mesure que le printemps avance, c’est par milliers que les observations de libellules nous arrivent dans le cadre du Projet Libellule, en commençant par le Sud de l’Ontario et du Québec et la Colombie‑Britannique et en enchaînant avec d’autres villes d’un océan à l’autre. Nous voudrions aujourd’hui savoir quelles sont les observations qui sont les plus captivantes ou exceptionnelles. Adressez nous un commentaire ou taguez nous dans un billet sur Instagram ou sur Facebook (@canards_illimites, #ProjetLibellule).

Anotado en 14 de junio de 2022 a las 08:16 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

What’s your best observation to date?

As spring has progressed, thousands of dragonfly observations have poured into Project Dragonfly, starting in southern Ontario, Quebec and B.C., and then filling in the gaps across Canada. Now we’d like to know—what observation of yours has been most exciting or unusual? Tell us in a comment or tag us in a post on Instagram or Facebook (@ducksunlimitedcanada, #ProjectDragonfly).

Anotado en 14 de junio de 2022 a las 08:23 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

24 de junio de 2022

Observation of the Week: Four-spotted skimmer

Last week's feature was a four-spotted skimmer, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user marykrieger in Manitoba. Four-spotted skimmers prefer marshy lakes, fens, acid bogs, plant-filled ponds, and very slow streams. Adults are found over fields and along woody edges and they may form swarms over open water; juveniles are often seen far from water.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on , Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

dragonfly macro by marykrieger

Anotado en 24 de junio de 2022 a las 03:24 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Observation of the Week: variegated meadowhawk

This week's feature is a variegated meadowhawk, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user anthea2nature near Langley, BC. This species is found from British Columbia east to Ontario, extending south through much of the U.S. to southern California east to Florida. It migrates as far south as Honduras in Central America, and also occurs in eastern Asia.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

dragonfly macro by anthea2nature

Anotado en 24 de junio de 2022 a las 03:36 PM por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario